SermonsCrossroads Church


Missed a Sunday message and like to hear have a second chance to listen? This is the place where you can find all Sunday semons from Crossroads dating back to the summer of 2013.
God of the Lost

God of the Lost

Jesus often spoke in parables. It is through parables that he was telling about the deeper fabric of the truth of life. These parables in Luke 15 are an answer to the grumbling Pharisees. They were wondering: why would Jesus care about sinners? Why would he chose such unsavoury company over them, the righteous Pharisees. That’s when Jesus turns to three parables to tell about the reason for the company he keeps. All three parables are about the heart of Jesus for those who are lost, those who do not know they are lost and those who lose themselves in the maze of life. The parables depict God being the one who loses, that which rightfully belongs to Him. At the moment of the realisation that the sheep, coin and the son are lost the heart of God in Jesus is on full display. It shows God’s determination to search and find the lost. The parables are also about those who have lost their way with God. They are all lost not only in relation to themselves and the world but lost in relation to God. The way back is paved by God Himself who finds His way to the one’s that are lost. Each time God finds the lost He calls to celebrate with Him in His joy.
 Through Jesus’ eyes
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Through Jesus’ eyes

Deborah Habnit
Sunday 24 November 2019
This Sunday we’ll explore what it means to see people the way Jesus sees them—seeing through Jesus’ eyes—from Mark 1:39-45.
Walking the Maze
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Walking the Maze

Hilary Porrit
Sunday 17 November 2019
Luke 15:1-2, 11-32 
When God loses some is like a father who loses a son. In the parables of the lost sheep and the lost coin, the reason why they are lost is not indicated. It seems to be a given. The concern of the shepherd and the woman speaks loud and clear. This parable speaks to the question: why is it that one gets lost in the maze of life? The answer is: desires, choices and phase of life (coming-of-age). The focus of this parable is the father who is actually a Christ figure. He is the one who is willing to love even if it costs him everything. His love of his younger son is a self-sacrificial love. He loses property, wealth and even reputation. Lovers are losers. God is willing to go a long way. His love is longsuffering and patient as he looks for the return of his son. The maze of life, our choices and desires bring us at times nowhere. Home is there where the father is waiting. God is determined in waiting for those who are on their way home out of the maze of life, once home there is joy and celebration. 
Lost and Unaware
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Lost and Unaware

Szaszi Bene
Sunday 10 November 2019
Luke 15:1-2, 8-10
 
When God loses someone is like a woman who loses a coin. This parable is not far from our lives. The challenge is to see ourselves as lost coin. The truth is that we become what we love. When money becomes the most important thing we long for, desire and pursue with all of our strength, we become like money. Being lost in this manner might mean that we are unaware of how far lost we are. Jesus sets the parable in a domestic situation and it portrays God as a woman who has lost a silver coin worth a day’s wage. Question: what is the amount of money that you can afford to lose? The woman in parable cannot afford to lose even one. She does three things: light a lamp, sweep and seek diligently until she finds the coin. All along the coin is unaware of how much she has done to find it. When she finds the coin, she cannot contain her joy and celebrates with the neighbors. God is determined to find that which is lost and when He finds the lost there is joy and celebration.
Lost
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Lost

Szaszi Bene
Sunday 03 November 2019
Luke 15:1-7
When God loses someone is like a shepherd who loses a sheep. The relationship between sheep and shepherd is an intimate relationship, a caring relationship even though the sheep is an animal and the shepherd a human being. Why the sheep goes missing we do not know. The shepherd’s determination to find the lost sheep goes very far. He is willing to take the risk of leaving most other sheep unattended just to find the one lost. The one lost is not written off as loss, but it is passionately pursued to be found. God’s economy is different than market economy, where a certain percentage of goods and even people are dispensable. When the sheep is found he is held and carried, underlining the intimacy of the relationship. God’s love for the one sheep implies His love for all sheep. This is how much He loves and how far He is willing to go. God is determined to find that which is lost and when He finds the lost there is joy and celebration.
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