SermonsCrossroads Church


Missed a Sunday message and like to hear have a second chance to listen? This is the place where you can find all Sunday semons from Crossroads dating back to the summer of 2013.

Latest sermon


Death
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Death

Sarah Hamel-Brown
Sunday 08 March 2020
This week we will finish a series about the cycle of birth-life-death, which we are calling Phenomenon, this time on the theme of “Death”. As Toby Mac puts it, "We live forever, die whenever". With this in mind we could easily adapt our world-view to live like there is no tomorrow. Only there is a tomorrow... and that tomorrow knows no end; it will literally last forever. With this in mind, perhaps we can live each day, not as our last, but as our first, in light of the eternity ahead of us. See Galatians 2:20.
 
Phenomenon: Birth - Life - Death

Phenomenon: Birth - Life - Death

This week we are starting a new 3-week series about the cycle of birth-life-death, which we are calling Phenomenon, beginning with the theme of “Birth” from John 3:1-15. This leads up to a series in the Gospels (four portraits of Jesus, in His birth, life, death and resurrection) that will take us up to our interactive Good Friday gathering, and our Easter celebration in April. 
Death
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Death

Sarah Hamel-Brown
Sunday 08 March 2020
This week we will finish a series about the cycle of birth-life-death, which we are calling Phenomenon, this time on the theme of “Death”. As Toby Mac puts it, "We live forever, die whenever". With this in mind we could easily adapt our world-view to live like there is no tomorrow. Only there is a tomorrow... and that tomorrow knows no end; it will literally last forever. With this in mind, perhaps we can live each day, not as our last, but as our first, in light of the eternity ahead of us. See Galatians 2:20.
 
Life
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Life

Hillary Porrit
Sunday 01 March 2020
This week we are in the second of a 3-week series about the cycle of birth-life-death, which we are calling Phenomenon. On Sunday, we’ll explore some of the biblical perspectives on the theme of “Life” as we ponder Simon Peter’s question to Jesus: “Lord, to whom can we go? You have the words of eternal life.”
Birth
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Birth

Szaszi Bene
Sunday 23 February 2020
This week we are starting a new 3-week series about the cycle of birth-life-death, which we are calling Phenomenon, beginning with the theme of “Birth” from John 3:1-15. This leads up to a series in the Gospels (four portraits of Jesus, in His birth, life, death and resurrection) that will take us up to our interactive Good Friday gathering, and our Easter celebration in April. 
Losing My Religion

Losing My Religion

`We are starting a 6-week series exploring Galatians called “Losing my Religion”. We will be unpacking the sense in which the walk of faith is one of letting go of the “oughts and should” of every kind of personal or corporate rule-keeping and replacing them with the faith and love of God to guide our lives instead. This is the essence of the life of grace that we seek to embrace as a community. 
Flesh versus Spirit
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Flesh versus Spirit

Maurice Lubbers
Sunday 16 February 2020
This Sunday we will close our current series on Galatians called, Losing My Religion, by exploring Galatians 5:16 – 6:18 about the dynamic of flesh versus spirit, the old self that is in tension with the new self that has been given us. 
Until Christ be formed in you!
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Until Christ be formed in you!

Szaszi Bene
Sunday 09 February 2020
We continue our 6-week series called, Losing My Religion, by exploring Gal 4:8 – 5:15 about Christ being formed in us as children of the promise, free from the slavery to “weak and worthless elementary principles of the world”, embracing the truth that the only thing that counts is “faith working through love”. Our joy can be restored in experiencing transformation as we live this different kind of life in and through God’s Spirit.
The Coming of Faith
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The Coming of Faith

Sietse Houtman
Sunday 02 February 2020
We continue our 6-week series called, Losing My Religion, by exploring Galatians 3:23 to 4:7 about what the coming of faith means: people in every station of life are made equal to each other, we are adopted as God’s own children and we become full heirs of all that belongs to our Father. Losing our religious, controlling, rule-keeping, score-keeping approach to life in exchange for this infinite gain is cause for a life of celebration and an eagerness to follow this Jesus who made the way for us to this new mode of living.
The Law and The Promise
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The Law and The Promise

Hilary Porrit
Sunday 26 January 2020
We continue our series, Losing My Religion, by exploring Galatians 3:6-22. We see here the vast difference between living under the law, with its rule-keeping and fear of consequences, and living under the God’s promise, where responding to God’s grace becomes the motivation for our behavior. Many of us are reading the whole letter to the Galatians during this series to allow the Gospel content to soak deeply in our thoughts and experience.
Walking in the Truth of the Gospel
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Walking in the Truth of the Gospel

Szaszi Bene
Sunday 19 January 2020
Join us in reading the full book of Galatians, a letter from Paul the Apostle to a number of Early Christian communities in Galatia. In this book, Paul establishes the importance of Grace compared to the Law and has lessons for us centuries later as we walk in the truth of the Gospel.
 
Paul Astonished and Inspired
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Paul Astonished and Inspired

Szaszi Bene
Sunday 12 January 2020
BECAUSE we want our community’s Scriptural diet to be balanced, sometimes with a series of studies that are thematic, alternating with studies that are more ‘expository’, ‘exegetical,’ letting themes come out of Scripture that we might never think of ourselves, here is an outline of a series in Galatians.
I have leaned on N. T. Wright’s booklet, ‘GALATIANS: 10 Studies,’ from his series ‘The Bible for Everyone’…but have shortened it from 10 to 6 installments.
Back in 1980, in Philadelphia, our dear friend and pastor, Jack Miller, said,
“Galatians is not my favorite New Testament letter; it’s confrontational and embarrassing. But it’s my experience, across the years, that if people don’t understand the message of Galatians, the Christian life won’t work for them.”
Because we desire that the Christian life will increasingly ‘work’ for our dear friends at Crossroads The Hague, I’m proposing that we do our best to cook up a feast of deliciously counter-intuitive sermons from Galatians…they didn’t fall from grace into bank-robbery; they fell from grace into religious pride! And may the Spirit guide us as we prepare and share!
One off sermon

One off sermon

One off sermon by Hud McWilliams
Start with Death
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Start with Death

Hud McWilliams
Sunday 29 September 2019
Start with Death

Join Hud as he considers the subject of death and discusses fear and the possible answer that is offered to the believer, now, for access to freedom and joy.
Gallery of Hope

Gallery of Hope

The theme of Living Hope for an Advent series sparked the idea to organize our December sermon series, exploring how the coming of Jesus brings hope 
to our personal lives, 
to our circles of family and friends, 
for our neighborhoods and cities 
for our nations and for our world.As we soaked in the scriptures using the word hope and then Scriptures that bring hope, we recognize that our hope is based on reliable information:
We have hope because of who God is: He is not only all-powerful and all-loving, He is present, He comes to where we are. Our future hope is that this powerful and loving God that is with us now and we know has been with us in the past, will also be present in our future, even though we might not be able to imagine now what he will do in that future.We have hope because of what God does: He creates. He creates beautiful things, both people and the rest of his creation, which are unique and precious and purposeful. And because he created a world in which there are choices--and because there is brokenness and separation and woundedness that come from choosing to move away from God and his purposes instead of toward God and his purposes—he relentlessly pursues restoring, reconciling, healing all that has strayed away.
Hope
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Hope

Caroline Zwart-Candelaria
Tuesday 24 December 2019
We have hope because of who God is: He is not only all-powerful and all-loving, He is present, He comes to where we are. Our future hope is that this powerful and loving God that is with us now and we know has been with us in the past, will also be present in our future, even though we might not be able to imagine now what he will do in that future.We have hope because of what God does: He creates. He creates beautiful things, both people and the rest of his creation, which are unique and precious and purposeful. And because he created a world in which there are choices--and because there is brokenness and separation and woundedness that come from choosing to move away from God and his purposes instead of toward God and his purposes—he relentlessly pursues restoring, reconciling, healing all that has strayed away.
Hope for our nations and for our world
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Hope for our nations and for our world

Szaszi Bene
Sunday 22 December 2019
Our hope is based on a reliable foundation:
We have hope because of who God is: He is not only all-powerful and all-loving, He is present, He comes to where we are. Our future hope is that this powerful and loving God that is with us now and we know has been with us in the past, will also be present in our future, even though we might not be able to imagine now what he will do in that future.We have hope because of what God does: He creates. He creates beautiful things, both people and the rest of his creation, which are unique and precious and purposeful. And because he created a world in which there are choices--and because there is brokenness and separation and woundedness that come from choosing to move away from God and his purposes instead of toward God and his purposes—he relentlessly pursues restoring, reconciling, healing all that has strayed away.
Hope for our circles of family and friends
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Hope for our circles of family and friends

Szaszi Bene
Sunday 08 December 2019
This week we continue our Gallery of Hope series with the story of Hannah in I Samuel 1, exploring the hope that God brings to, not only our personal lives, but also to our families and networks of relationships. 
Theology of Hope
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Theology of Hope

Bob Phillips
Sunday 01 December 2019
This Sunday we begin our Gallery of Hope Advent series. We will explore biblical hope from Jer. 29:10-14 and Psalm 126, with references to Theology of Hope by Jürgen Moltmann and True Spirituality by Francis Schaeffer. 
Check out our Instagram account or this link, where you will find a daily meditation through the Advent season.
God of the Lost

God of the Lost

Jesus often spoke in parables. It is through parables that he was telling about the deeper fabric of the truth of life. These parables in Luke 15 are an answer to the grumbling Pharisees. They were wondering: why would Jesus care about sinners? Why would he chose such unsavoury company over them, the righteous Pharisees. That’s when Jesus turns to three parables to tell about the reason for the company he keeps. All three parables are about the heart of Jesus for those who are lost, those who do not know they are lost and those who lose themselves in the maze of life. The parables depict God being the one who loses, that which rightfully belongs to Him. At the moment of the realisation that the sheep, coin and the son are lost the heart of God in Jesus is on full display. It shows God’s determination to search and find the lost. The parables are also about those who have lost their way with God. They are all lost not only in relation to themselves and the world but lost in relation to God. The way back is paved by God Himself who finds His way to the one’s that are lost. Each time God finds the lost He calls to celebrate with Him in His joy.
 Through Jesus’ eyes
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Through Jesus’ eyes

Deborah Habnit
Sunday 24 November 2019
This Sunday we’ll explore what it means to see people the way Jesus sees them—seeing through Jesus’ eyes—from Mark 1:39-45.
Walking the Maze
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Walking the Maze

Hilary Porrit
Sunday 17 November 2019
Luke 15:1-2, 11-32 
When God loses some is like a father who loses a son. In the parables of the lost sheep and the lost coin, the reason why they are lost is not indicated. It seems to be a given. The concern of the shepherd and the woman speaks loud and clear. This parable speaks to the question: why is it that one gets lost in the maze of life? The answer is: desires, choices and phase of life (coming-of-age). The focus of this parable is the father who is actually a Christ figure. He is the one who is willing to love even if it costs him everything. His love of his younger son is a self-sacrificial love. He loses property, wealth and even reputation. Lovers are losers. God is willing to go a long way. His love is longsuffering and patient as he looks for the return of his son. The maze of life, our choices and desires bring us at times nowhere. Home is there where the father is waiting. God is determined in waiting for those who are on their way home out of the maze of life, once home there is joy and celebration. 
Lost and Unaware
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Lost and Unaware

Szaszi Bene
Sunday 10 November 2019
Luke 15:1-2, 8-10
 
When God loses someone is like a woman who loses a coin. This parable is not far from our lives. The challenge is to see ourselves as lost coin. The truth is that we become what we love. When money becomes the most important thing we long for, desire and pursue with all of our strength, we become like money. Being lost in this manner might mean that we are unaware of how far lost we are. Jesus sets the parable in a domestic situation and it portrays God as a woman who has lost a silver coin worth a day’s wage. Question: what is the amount of money that you can afford to lose? The woman in parable cannot afford to lose even one. She does three things: light a lamp, sweep and seek diligently until she finds the coin. All along the coin is unaware of how much she has done to find it. When she finds the coin, she cannot contain her joy and celebrates with the neighbors. God is determined to find that which is lost and when He finds the lost there is joy and celebration.
Lost
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Lost

Szaszi Bene
Sunday 03 November 2019
Luke 15:1-7
When God loses someone is like a shepherd who loses a sheep. The relationship between sheep and shepherd is an intimate relationship, a caring relationship even though the sheep is an animal and the shepherd a human being. Why the sheep goes missing we do not know. The shepherd’s determination to find the lost sheep goes very far. He is willing to take the risk of leaving most other sheep unattended just to find the one lost. The one lost is not written off as loss, but it is passionately pursued to be found. God’s economy is different than market economy, where a certain percentage of goods and even people are dispensable. When the sheep is found he is held and carried, underlining the intimacy of the relationship. God’s love for the one sheep implies His love for all sheep. This is how much He loves and how far He is willing to go. God is determined to find that which is lost and when He finds the lost there is joy and celebration.
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